ARTISTS

Click on the artist’s name to find out more about their work.
Our Collection changes regularly, so pop back to see what’s new or check out our events page for news of upcoming shows.

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Paintings

Paul Doran

Gerard Maguire

Neil Shawcross

Ciaran Lennon

Tessie Mac

Alan Graham

Deborah Campbell

Dennis Kelly

Seán Nichol

Desmond Monroe

Manson Blair

Stephen Shaw

David Magowan

Frank Egginton

Charles McAuley

Barbara Allen

Paul Walls

Michael O’Neill

Photography

Fergus Noone

Aaron Dickson

Frankie Quinn

Sculpture and Textiles

Freda Gilmore

Barbara Allen

Barbara Allen

Manson Blair

Manson Blair was born near Ballyclare, Co Antrim in 1947. From his early years, he always had an interest in art and drawing. After attending Stranmillis College from 1965-68 he embarked upon a teaching career in Larne, moving later to Carrickfergus and in 2004 retired after 26 years in Ballyclare Primary School,


Deborah Campbell

Deborah Campbell was born in Belfast and studied art and photography at the University of Ulster. She lectured in art and photography in Belfast and continues to be involved in art education.
Later on, Deborah swapped city life for a rural lifestyle in Co Down. She draws inspiration from the countryside in which she lives, capturing the spirit of the wildlife of County Down.

Aaron Dickson LBIPP

Aaron’s interest in photography started over 15 years ago when he began travelling. This interest quickly grew into a passion, alongside his love of travelling and became a search for wild, untouched places, taking him to Mongolia, Himalayan Nepal and the highlands of Iceland.

Becoming a fulltime photographer in 2016 gave him the time to develop his passion into an art, which led him towards using film for his photography, shooting on a 40-year-old film camera. In 2017, he won 4 awards for his work and was granted a Licentiate by the BIPP.
His work focuses on minimalism, reducing the landscape down to simple compositions and subtle palettes, with the resulting images often close to monochrome. This collection features images from Ireland’s north and west coasts, the Outer Hebrides in Scotland, and Iceland; low population areas where Aaron has been seeking out the perfect blank canvas in nature, using snow, sand and sea to eliminate distractions, and draw the viewer’s eye long enough to capture the imagination.
He still continues to travel for his work, joined by his wife Kerry and their 10-month-old daughter Esme, who has been to Iceland, the Outer Hebrides and more recently Patagonia.

Paul Doran

Freda Gilmore comes from a family tradition of artists and has practiced various art techniques throughout her life. Life drawing, clay modelling, and portrait painting gradually led to her passion for bronze portraiture and sculpture generally.

Doran returned home to set up and paint from his Belfast Studio. He faces his challenges through expressive and experimental paintings; pushing to illustrate the socio-political obstacle course that the Belfast of yesteryear still presents. Doran’s paintings are full of movement, they are emotive and gestural, relaying a unique understanding of his urban environment.
In addition to painting, Paul Doran was the vision and initiator behind the No Walls Project which saw a trio of artists from across Europe (Paul Doran, KRM and John Costi) collaborate on a Visual and Performance Arts Piece at The Andrews Gallery, Titanic and across chosen Peace Walls in the City in November 2017. It is planned to bring the No Walls Project to Brussels, Israel, London and New York over the next 18 months.
Paul Doran’s paintings have been exhibited in Belfast, Liverpool and the Ivory Coast. His artwork continues to gain recognition both here and abroad, with parallels between his paintings and those of Jean-Michel Basquait and de Kooning often made. Paul’s work is available for sale exclusively at The Hallows Gallery, Belfast.

Freda Gilmore

Freda Gilmore comes from a family tradition of artists and has practiced various art techniques throughout her life. Life drawing, clay modelling, and portrait painting gradually led to her passion for bronze portraiture and sculpture generally.

The permanence of this medium appeals to her and through it she is happy to express her views and portray the influences which have shaped her life. Family life, teaching young children, living through the “troubles" in Northern Ireland and fascination with wild life, are all represented in her work.

Alan Graham

Alan Graham was born in Dublin in 1939. In his early twenties, he moved to Belfast to start his artistic career as an apprentice linen designer in John Shaw Brown. After three years, he returned to the city of his birth to work as a commercial artist at one of Dublin’s leading advertising companies.

It was during this time, that he attended the College of Art, now better known as the National College of Art and Design based on Thomas Street.
A keen adventurer and mountaineer, Alan’s work has clearly been shaped by of his love of nature. A true colourist, Alan does not shy away from bringing in bold colours that you might not usually expect to find in the Irish landscape. His perceptions of nature are often evocative of the impressionistic works of Claude Monet, although you can clearly see the influence of Jackson Pollock creeping in.

Dennis Kelly

Born in Belfast, Dennis Kelly has been painting for over 40 years. Dennis is a founding member and twice president of the Arts Society of Ulster. His work has featured in its annual show for 20 years.
His first solo exhibition was in 1982 in the Ulster Arts Club. Since then, he has exhibited many times, with his work often featuring in the RUA’s annual show as well as an appearance at the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin.

Dennis’ artwork is immediately recognisable with his use of enamel paint creating a distinctive and bold finish. Dennis’ ability to focus in on often smaller details of what he sees in the world around him brings a new complexity and beauty to what could often be missed by the passer by. A fondness for the more surreal or abstract can often be found in his works. More recently, Dennis has been concentrating on painting triptychs – creating a set of three paintings intended to be appreciated together.
His latest series, ‘after Hokusai’ celebrates and explores the work of 19th Century Japanese painter and print maker, Katsushika Hokusai. Dennis has approached the subject with a sense of joy and humour as he incorporates elements of his homeland in this series.
Dennis continues to live and paint in Belfast.

Ciarán Lennon

Ciarán Lennon was born in Dublin in 1947. He studied at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin from 1963 to 1967. Since 1972, Lennon has had numerous solo exhibitions in museums and art galleries within Ireland and abroad. Including the National Gallery of Ireland (2002), The Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin (2009 and 2014), as well as a solo show in The Galerie Lahumier, Paris (1996).

His works are in public and private collections across the globe including Paris, New York, Boston and London to name a few.
Lennon was elected to Aosdána in 1993 (a State honour conferred on artists whose work has made an outstanding contribution to the arts in Ireland).
Lennon has previously commented that his minimalist paintings are
“… addressed to the unknown lone viewer/observer, the sole subject and centre of my art.”
Lennon continues to live and work in Dublin

Frankie Quinn

Frankie Quinn was born in Belfast in 1966. He was brought up in The Short Strand/Ballymacarrett area of the City and has lived there ever since.
He began taking photos in 1982, documenting conflict in Ireland and further afield, in places such as Palestine, Israel, Turkey, Kurdistan and Bosnia. As well as exhibitions in Belfast, Quinn has exhibited in Australia, The US, France, Norway, Italy and England.



Quinn’s work is currently on display at The Ulster Museum as part of the new photographic exhibition on ‘The Troubles’ – ‘Conflicting Images’. It will run until November 2017. The Museum has recently purchased a substantial number of Frankie Quinn’s original dark room prints for its own permanent collection.
The Photographs at The Hallows, hand printed by Frankie in the Dark Room, focus more on everyday life during this period in Belfast rather than on ‘The Troubles’ themselves.
Frankie has remained a freelance photographer. He is the director of the Belfast Archive Project and is currently studying for a Master of Fine Arts Degree at the University of Ulster.

Michael O' Neill

Fergus Noone

Fergus Noone was born in Co. Wicklow, Ireland. He became interested in photography as a teenager, with a particular love of black and white, printing his own darkroom prints.

He left his rural home in 1985 and moved to London to pursue a career in photography. In 1988, he began selling his work at the renowned flourishing art and craft market in Greenwich. The stall became such a success that in 1996, Fergus opened his first gallery in Greenwich showcasing his growing collection.
In the 1990s, he took time away from London to photograph a black and white portfolio of traditional horse fairs and festivals throughout Ireland as the island approached the new millennia. His father and his father before him had walked cattle to the fair at Ballinasloe, and this was where Fergus first became captivated with the hustle and bustle of life at the horse fair.
This collection captures the horse trading, racing and even the rare quieter moments from Horse Fairs and Traveller Life from Spancilhill, Ballinasloe to Smithfield in Dublin.

Seán Nichol (1920-2005)

Seán Nichol was born in 1920 in Belfast. Seán and his siblings were reared by two elderly Aunts in the Markets area of South Belfast after his parents died suddenly. It was during his childhood, that Seán began to foster his passion for painting.

After leaving school, Seán and his brother Gerry became the fourth generation of the family to cure bacon at their premises in Cromac Street. Seán then turned his hand to the Wine Merchant Business alongside his father-in-law, Felix Laverty. But before long, Seán, keen to return to his true passion, left to pursue his career in painting while working at the Orchard Gallery on the Newtownards Road.
In his free time, he would escape to Donegal, Connemara or the Glens of Antrim with his paints in hand and his little caravan. His paintings reflect the wild and rugged beauty of the Irish Countryside of his time.
Seán, while not an academician, was a member of the Royal Ulster Academy from the 1940s. And from this time, his work was displayed alongside other contemporary artists such as Maurice C Wilkes, Charles McAuley, Desmond Turner and Frank McKelvey in the Museum and Art Gallery Stranmillis, better known today as the Ulster Museum.
In addition to selling his artwork in Co. Donegal, Seán also painted on commission, most notably painting Colebrooke Park, the ancestral home of Lord Brookeborough.
Seán continued to paint until his death in 2005.

David Magowan

David Magowan is a contemporary artist, living and working in Belfast, Northern Ireland. He graduated in 2012 from the University of Ulster with a degree in Fine and Applied art. Since graduating he has focused his practice on painting and illustration. His diverse work is inspired by scenes and aspects of life in Ireland.

The City of Belfast features heavily within his work and he enjoys painting the historical character of the city and its evolving face for the future. He has always been interested and inspired by history and architecture, especially Ireland's rich architectural heritage. He believes local architecture and historical buildings are essential to maintaining Northern Ireland's unique identity. With so much of Northern Ireland's architectural heritage having been lost over the years through conflict, neglect and demolition, he wants to celebrate the survivors in his work and highlight in a contemporary way the importance of their conservation and the role the can play in a bright future for the city.

Gerard Maguire

Gerard Maguire is a Belfast based artist and has exhibited throughout Ireland for the last 16 years. He had his first solo exhibition in the Charles Gilmore Gallery, Holywood, Co.Down in March 2003 and this was followed by a 'New Works' exhibition in that gallery in September 2004.

Maguire has also shown in numerous group shows in the North and South of Ireland and has exhibited at the Emerging Art Exhibitions at The Waterfront Hall, Belfast from 1999-2002.
He was a regional and London finalist in the national Laing Art Competition in 1998 and has works in private collections both at home and abroad including that of Lord Eames. He was also commissioned to do a piece by the law Society of Northern Ireland to commemorate the opening of their new building in 2009 and a limited-edition print was made of the work.

Charles McAuley (1910-1999)

Charles McAuley was born in Glenaan, County Antrim in 1910. He briefly attended the Belfast School of Art before returning to Glenaan where he continued to paint.
In 1929, he won a premier award for Celtic Design.

The adjudicator was none other than J.Humbert Craig – an artist whose work would have a profound influence on the young Charles.
He primarily focued on painting landscapes, particularly in the Glens of Antrim. Charles continued to paint until he passed away in 1999.

Desmond Monroe

Desmond Monroe was born in Belfast in 1943. Monroe has had a keen interest in drawing and painting from his early life. After spending more than 30 years a his craft and developing his style, Monroe became a professional painter in 1993.

Monroe’s work demonstrates an uncanny ability to capture the ever-changing mood of the Irish landscape while his more contemporary style adds a thought provoking dimension to his portfolio.
Monroe’s popularity has steadily grown over the years, and his work is in high demand both in Northern Ireland and Dublin.
Primarily a landscape painter, Monroe’s recent work sees him drawn to more figurative work, most notably "End of Shift" or “Music Man". The figures of these works lack facial detail and are painted in bold strokes with rich colours. The absence of faces hinting at the anonymity of the figures – the working men of Belfast.

Stephen Shaw

Stephen Shaw is a professional artist with studios based at his home on the Ormeau Road and in Belfast's Cathedral Quarter. Stephen’s work concentrates on the beautiful, but difficult, medium of watercolour. Attempting to "push the boundaries" of how the medium is perceived and appears. Everything you see is 100% watercolour paint, made with brushes alone.

The paintings are alive with colour and detail and focus on that which could generally perceived as drab, decaying, mundane, or overlooked. Stephen rarely paints well known landmarks or tourist attractions. This is not "Olde Belfast". He has stood before and recorded everything he’s painted.
Although important elements, the work is not an exercise in nostalgia or historic documentation, but also, hopefully, a fresh way of looking at “everyday” places. Nothing is “normal”, everything is unique. Something of interest and beauty can be found almost anywhere. Stephen sees semi abstract compositions in the places that attract him and these are the basis of many of the paintings.
An underlying theme is the effects of nature and decay on the built fabric of Belfast, Ireland, and Beyond. How age, neglect, vandalism and natural weathering have rendered once pristine surfaces into multi coloured and textured semi abstract artworks in themselves. Time and the Elements of Nature becoming its own Artist.
Alienation, confrontation, provocation, memories and legacies of "The Troubles" in Northern Ireland are present in the work. The effects of the destruction and redevelopment of Communities and Neighbourhoods in Belfast are also major influences.

Neil Shawcross

Neil Shawcross was born in England in 1940 but has lived in Northern Ireland since 1962. He was educated at Bolton College of Art and then at Lancaster College of Art and as a result has exhibited at many galleries extensively throughout Ireland, as well as in London, Hong Kong and the USA. He then went on to teach at the Belfast College of Art and now spends his retirement devoting his time to his own art.

Neil’s works consists mainly of portraits and still life. The inspiration for his still life paintings come from his surroundings, and he is able to transform a simple subject giving it character through simple brush strokes.
Shawcross’ work has been exhibited in places such as the Ulster Museum and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and has also been a five-time recipient of the Royal Ulster Academy Gold Medal. His new works are incredibly popular amongst collectors in both Ireland and abroad. In 1975 he became an associate of the Royal Ulster Academy, becoming an Academician in 1977.

Paul Walls RUA

Paul Walls was born in Belfast in 1965. He trained at the Manchester Medlock Fine Arts Centre before returning to Northern Ireland to continue to develop his art. Paul was elected an Associate Academician of the RUA in 1999.
Paul’s work has been exhibited in many solo and group shows in Belfast, Dublin and London. His work is held by private and public collections across the country and further afield, including The Ulster Museum and The National Self Portrait Collection.

Throughout his career, Paul’s distinctive and textured pieces have earned him many awards such as the Arts Council of Northern Ireland Official Arts Award, The Irish News Prize RUA and the Ulster Arts Club Gallery Award.
Paul is well known for his heavily impastoed and textured work with oil applied so thickly that it gives his work a structural dimension, as Art Critic, Amanda Croft remarked, it appears ‘sculptural in nature’.
Paul lives in Belfast with his family where he continues to paint and teach.After leaving school, Seán and his brother Gerry became the fourth generation of the family to cure bacon at their premises in Cromac Street. Seán then turned his hand to the Wine Merchant Business alongside his father-in-law, Felix Laverty. But before long, Seán, keen to return to his true passion, left to pursue his career in painting while working at the Orchard Gallery on the Newtownards Road.
In his free time, he would escape to Donegal, Connemara or the Glens of Antrim with his paints in hand and his little caravan. His paintings reflect the wild and rugged beauty of the Irish Countryside of his time.
Seán, while not an academician, was a member of the Royal Ulster Academy from the 1940s. And from this time, his work was displayed alongside other contemporary artists such as Maurice C Wilkes, Charles McAuley, Desmond Turner and Frank McKelvey in the Museum and Art Gallery Stranmillis, better known today as the Ulster Museum.
In addition to selling his artwork in Co. Donegal, Seán also painted on commission, most notably painting Colebrooke Park, the ancestral home of Lord Brookeborough.
Seán continued to paint until his death in 2005.